Sugar, Sugar, Everywhere

Published: Nov 8, 2017

This week’s show is focused on IDM patient, Annette Demers, who didn’t realize hidden sources of sugar were holding her back.

Links:

STUDY: Acarbose treatment and the risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in patients with impaired glucose tolerance: the STOP-NIDDM trial

STUDY: A limit on the energy transfer rate from the human fat store in hypophagia.

Dr Peter Brukner’s “Sugar by half” campaign

Non-Scale Victories

Published: Nov 1, 2017

This week, IDM patient Kim Demarest shares her non-scale victories. We focus on benefits of fasting and lowering insulin other than purely weight loss. At the same time, Professor Tim Noakes and Dr. Aseem Malhotra talk about her struggles: trying to exercise your way out of a bad diet, and the ghost of high cholesterol. Dr. Jason Fung talks about her non-scale victories including increased mental acuity and increased body heat.

Links:

STUDY: Changes in Energy Expenditure Resulting from Altered Body Weight

BOOK: Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

Professor Tim Noakes

BLOG: Zoe Harcombe. Why we can’t outrun a bad diet

Dr. Aseem Malhotra

RESEARCH: Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review 

Questions for IDM Part #1

Published: Oct 23, 2017

This week we pause to let Jason and Megan answer questions about fasting and nutrition. The questions are a) Is insulin resistance forever? b) What’s the difference between fasting and caloric restriction? c) Is a low-carb diet hard on the kidneys? and d) what are the most common hurdles that IDM patients face when starting a regimen of ketogenic dieting and fasting?

Links:

Study: Effect of short-term carbohydrate overfeeding and long-term weight loss on liver fat in overweight humans

Study: Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD)

 

Blaming the Victim

Published: Oct 17, 2017

Kim Klein blamed herself for her inability to control her hunger and her weight. No matter what she tried, it didn’t work. After learning about how insulin regulates weight and hunger, she was able to bring it under control. Dr. Fung has a theory about why the medical profession continues to point the blame at patients when there is clearly an epidemic of obesity and diabetes.